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About Demme Learning

Demme Learning is an independent family-owned and operated publishing company. Based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Demme Learning has been providing innovative learning solutions for homeschoolers, parents and small group learning environments since 1990.

Online Homeschool Conventions (2020)


There are several online homeschool conventions that you can attend in 2020.

There are several online homeschool conventions that you can attend in 2020. If we are missing a convention, please comment below with a link. 😀

Upcoming Online Homeschool Conventions in 2020

Homeschool Connect Expo (May)

Date

May 27-31, 2020

Description

Homeschool Connect Expo is peaceful and easy! There is no rush hour to fight, no lines to wait in & no aggressive sales person! Just you, your computer and your favorite chair! Plus…You can come dressed HOWEVER you want! No one will judge if you want to have your messy hair and pajamas on!

Learn More


Homeschool Connect Expo (July)

Date

July 22-26, 2020

Description

Homeschool Connect Expo is peaceful and easy! There is no rush hour to fight, no lines to wait in & no aggressive sales person! Just you, your computer and your favorite chair! Plus…You can come dressed HOWEVER you want! No one will judge if you want to have your messy hair and pajamas on!

Learn More


Homeschool Connect Expo (September)

Date

September 23-27, 2020

Description

Homeschool Connect Expo is peaceful and easy! There is no rush hour to fight, no lines to wait in & no aggressive sales person! Just you, your computer and your favorite chair! Plus…You can come dressed HOWEVER you want! No one will judge if you want to have your messy hair and pajamas on!

Learn More


Ongoing Online Homeschool Conventions

Keep Calm & Homeschool On (IAHE)

Description

We’ve barely had time to pick up the pieces from the cancelation of our 35th Annual IAHE Home Educators’ Convention, but we’re excited to move forward with our first online conference, Keep Calm & Homeschool On! Featuring over 40 speakers and 100 workshops! Workshop sessions will be prerecorded and can be watched from the comfort of your home whenever you want. Unlike an on-site convention where you have to pick and choose your sessions, you’ll have access to EVERY SINGLE workshop for an entire year. Our Virtual Vendor Hall will be full of homeschooling resources, special pricing, freebies, and much more. Information is being added daily!

Learn More


Homeschool Oklahoma Online Conference

Description

This event is designed to equip, inform, and encourage both new and experienced home educators in their homeschool journey.

Learn More


Year Round Free Homeschool Convention

Description

[W]e want our convention to fit into your schedule. Our videos are available for free year round. This allows you to watch at your own pace! Grab a cup of coffee and watch a video session or two before the kids get up. Invite your fellow homeschool moms over to watch too- have a homeschool moms night out! We want this to work for you.

Learn More


Previous Online Homeschool Conventions

Homeschool Teaching 2.0 Summit

Date

March 2-6, 2020

Description

How do you balance discipling your children’s character while working through math lessons and field trips and laundry and spelling tests and so much more? How about this: The Homeschool Teaching Summit will refresh your excitement for the journey, equip you with practical management tools, and transform your vision for education and discipleship.

Learn More


Online Classical Conference (GHC)

Date

March 19-21, 2020

Description

Join us for online conferences featuring some of your favorite classical education speakers and vendors!

Learn More


Homebound Online Conference

Date

March 23-27, 2020

Description

We invite you to join us and our friends for a FREE Online Homeschool and “Suddenly-at-Home” School Conference. Since you are home, we want to fill that time with nourishment and growth, so when you burst forth into the world again, you are full of confidence and resources.

Learn More


Homeschool Connect Expo (March)

Date

March 25-29, 2020

Description

Homeschool Connect Expo is peaceful and easy! There is no rush hour to fight, no lines to wait in & no aggressive sales person! Just you, your computer and your favorite chair! Plus…You can come dressed HOWEVER you want! No one will judge if you want to have your messy hair and pajamas on!

Learn More


Multi-Ethnic Homeschool Moms Conference

Date

March 29 – April 3, 2020

Description

We’ve rallied some of the world’s most influential home education pioneers to bring you a powerful conference that is sure to impact you for years to come.

Learn More


Spring Into Action Homeschool Bootcamp (HECOA)

Date

March 30–April 3, 2020

Description

Finally, get clarity and direction for your homeschool. Learn how to teach effectively. Receive practical, doable tips and ideas. Gain knowledge and insight into educational resources. Walk away with the confidence and inspiration to set up your homeschool.

Learn More


Home and Haven Online Homeschool Conference

Date

April 1st, 2020

Description

We wanted to offer a homeschool conference that you could enjoy right from the comfort of your home. Watch the break out sessions by yourself during naptimes or gather a group of your homeschool girlfriends for a mini conference! The content will be available for you to watch and soak up at your own pace.

Learn More


Homeschool Parenting Online Summit

Date

April 6-10, 2020

Description

Join 25 speakers with our hosts and learn to:

• Focus on God’s simple plan for family discipleship
• Recharge your motivation
• Faithfully take action to raise children who love God and others

Learn More

There will be several video workshop sessions, exhibit hall specials, and live events that will encourage and equip you along your homeschooling journey.


Great Homeschool Conventions Online

Date

April 16-18, 2020

Description

There will be several video workshop sessions, exhibit hall specials, and live events that will encourage and equip you along your homeschooling journey.

Learn More


Homeschool Curriculum Summit 2.0

Date

May 4-8, 2020

Description

Join our hosts and 25+ homeschool curriculum creators and providers for this event relaunch that will help you:

• Evaluate your curriculum options with a Christian worldview
• to Identify the right fit for every student for every subject
• so you can Homeschool with confidence!

Learn More


Did We Miss Any?

If we are missing a convention, please comment below with a link. 😀

Homeschool Convention Guide

Attending a homeschool convention can be a challenge. This guide is offered to help you become the victorious conqueror of the homeschool convention.


We have been helping parents teach their children at home for over 30 years and have some free resources that will help if you're in a quarantine situation.

2020 Homeschool Convention Guide [Coronavirus Update]


Attending a homeschool convention can be a challenge. This guide is offered to help you become the victorious conqueror of the homeschool convention.

In the early days of homeschooling, parents had to order from catalogs or go to a homeschool convention to purchase materials. For encouragement, they depended on co-ops and support groups. Now, online ordering and social media have made homeschooling much more convenient. However, there are still some really great reasons that homeschoolers should attend their state convention or local conference!

Coronavirus Update

Several in-person homeschool conventions have been cancelled in the wake of the Coronavirus pandemic. We have updated this guide to reflect that; the section on online homeschool conventions has more information and has been moved to the top. If you’re aware of an online convention that isn’t on the list, please tell us about it in the comments.

We here at Demme Learning are doing what we can to help. Though we may not be able to see you in-person, we have an amazing group of people ready and willing to help. We know many people attend homeschool conferences to learn more about products and receive discounts. We have resources for you:

Use “DL2020” at store.demmelearning.com during check out to receive 10% off your order. Free Shipping is available for all orders over $30. This offer is good through April 30th.

You can download a PDF of our Magalog (combination magazine and catalog). It has great information about our products and a few articles to help you get started out.

We have removed the login from the webinar section of the Demme Learning Guild. This gives you access to over 30 hours of curated instruction and support from our staff.

Please feel free to share this information with your friends and family. We desire to be a source of help during this trying time.

Online Homeschool Conventions

If attending a homeschool convention isn’t possible for you, consider an online homeschool convention. It can be more affordable (often free), and more convenient for your schedule.

Homeschool Connect Expo

March 25-29, 2020

Homeschool Connect Expo is peaceful and easy! There is no rush hour to fight, no lines to wait in & no aggressive sales person! Just you, your computer and your favorite chair! Plus…You can come dressed HOWEVER you want! No one will judge if you want to have your messy hair and pajamas on!

Online Classical Conference (GHC)

March 19-21, 2020

Join us for online conferences featuring some of your favorite classical education speakers and vendors!

Keep Calm & Homeschool On (IAHE)

March 27th, 2020 (Save the Date)

We’ve barely had time to pick up the pieces from the cancelation of our 35th Annual IAHE Home Educators’ Convention, but we’re excited to move forward with our first online conference, Keep Calm & Homeschool On! Featuring over 40 speakers and 100 workshops! Workshop sessions will be prerecorded and can be watched from the comfort of your home whenever you want. Unlike an on-site convention where you have to pick and choose your sessions, you’ll have access to EVERY SINGLE workshop for an entire year. Our Virtual Vendor Hall will be full of homeschooling resources, special pricing, freebies, and much more. Information is being added daily!

Spring Into Action Homeschool Bootcamp

March 30–April 3, 2020

Finally, get clarity and direction for your homeschool. Learn how to teach effectively. Receive practical, doable tips and ideas. Gain knowledge and insight into educational resources. Walk away with the confidence and inspiration to set up your homeschool.

Great Homeschool Conventions Online

April 16-18, 2020

Information coming soon!

Year Round Free Homeschool Convention

[W]e want our convention to fit into your schedule. Our videos are available for free year round. This allows you to watch at your own pace! Grab a cup of coffee and watch a video session or two before the kids get up. Invite your fellow homeschool moms over to watch too- have a homeschool moms night out! We want this to work for you.

Homeschool Teaching 2.0 Summit

March 2-6, 2020

How do you balance discipling your children’s character while working through math lessons and field trips and laundry and spelling tests and so much more? How about this: The Homeschool Teaching Summit will refresh your excitement for the journey, equip you with practical management tools, and transform your vision for education and discipleship.

5 Reasons to Attend a Homeschool Convention

Let me offer five reasons why, in my opinion, all homeschoolers should attend a homeschool convention.

1) Support Others

Think back to your early homeschooling days. You can probably identify at least one person who helped you get started, answered your questions, and encouraged you over the rough spots. The homeschooling convention provides an opportunity for you to offer that same support to others. When you’re walking the convention hall, watch for the newbie with the “deer in the headlights” look or the veteran homeschooler who droops with discouragement. You never know who you might be able to encourage!

2) Educate Yourself

Education is a constantly-changing field. As a home instructor, you owe it to yourself and your family to keep abreast of the latest developments. What new curriculum materials are available? What new ideas or techniques will help you in your teaching? Attending a homeschool convention will help you answer these questions.

3) Renew Your Vision

Why are you homeschooling? This question might take you aback for a moment, but it’s important to stop regularly and revisit why you made this important decision. The homeschooling convention can help you focus on what’s really important — the vision for what you do on a daily basis.

Homeschool convention joke by Todd Wilson.

Cartoon from Todd Wilson.

4) Visit the Vendors

If you’re a homeschooling veteran, you may be tempted to visit only certain vendors or bypass the exhibit hall entirely. But wait! Curriculum providers depend on customer feedback to help them determine whether they’re on the right track. If you let vendors know what you like and don’t like about their programs, the quality of homeschooling curriculum in general will improve, benefiting everyone.

5) Excel in Your Calling

If you have been called to homeschool, then you should train for your calling. The homeschooling convention provides the perfect opportunity to listen, learn, interact, and grow so that you can pursue excellence in your ministry as a homeschooling parent.

Notice that the first letters in the numbered points above spell out the word “SERVE.” A homeschool convention is an opportunity to serve — serve your family, serve other homeschoolers, and serve the vendors. Homeschooling conventions are an important resource; make sure you take advantage of the one nearest you this year.

Tips on How to Survive a Homeschool Convention

Whether it’s your first time or your fifteenth, attending a homeschool convention can be a challenge. You can come home enriched and encouraged, or you can come home defeated and drained—physically, mentally, and financially.

The following tips are offered to help you become the victorious conqueror of the homeschool convention.

Plan Ahead

Avoid the temptation to procrastinate — start planning early!

There are several important considerations to keep in mind when deciding how you will spend your time at the convention.

Think Through Travel & Lodging

Consider both economy and convenience. It may be cheaper to stay at a friend’s house, but it may make more sense to book a hotel that’s close to the convention.

Register Early

Take advantage of any “early bird” discounts, and get all the information you can about the convention ahead of time: featured speakers, workshops, vendors, map, directions, etc.

With this information in hand, you can begin planning your personal agenda.

Review the Schedule

Highlight the sessions you really want to attend. Consider alternate choices so that, if your first choice is full or turns out to be a dud, you can quickly slide into another session. Don’t feel that you need to attend a workshop every time one is offered.

If it’s a vendor workshop, you may be able to get the same information by visiting the booth in the exhibit hall.

Many conventions provide recordings of the sessions, which you can purchase for a nominal fee.

Think ahead to the exhibit hall. Be sure your personal agenda includes plenty of time for visiting the exhibit hall and for just plain resting. Homeschool conventions can be exhausting if you don’t stop to recharge your batteries.

Before You Go

Print out your registration confirmation, lodging information, directions, maps, and any other materials that you will need.

Homeschool convention joke by Todd Wilson.

Cartoon from Todd Wilson.

At the Convention

Into the fray! Armed with your personal agenda, you arrive on time and find a seat in your first workshop. Not what you expected? Don’t feel obligated to stay! Either slip into your alternate selection or revise your agenda – it’s meant to be a guide, not a dictator.

Perhaps you decide to visit the exhibit hall first. Be sure to give yourself time for at least three laps around, if the venue is not too large. The first time, look over all the booths, without stopping, to get a general overview of what’s available. Then take some time to decide which booths you want to visit more extensively.

On your second trip around, stop at the booths where you would like to get more information, enter drawings, or pick up catalogs. Now plan an extensive break that will allow you to make your final purchasing decisions.

Since you have scheduled your day wisely, given yourself breaks, and kept hydrated, you will come to the end of the convention feeling tired but happy. You will have gained inspiration and a renewed focus, ready to continue leading your family in its homeschooling adventure. You — yes, you! — have survived the homeschool convention!

What to Pack for a Homeschool Convention

At the very least you’ll want to pack your bag with comfy walking shoes and a notebook or electronic device for recording information.

If the venue allows, pack your own water and food, as you will be talking a lot.

Take a large tote bag (or, better yet, a bag on wheels, if permitted by the venue) for catalogs and purchases.

The following is a list of other items you may want to include in your homeschool convention packing list:

• Shopping list
• Phone chargers
• Camera
• Small first aid kit
• Activities and games for the littles
• Sweater or jacket

Additional Homeschool Convention Resources

There is a plethora of helpful information about homeschool conventions on the internet. Here are some resources that we’d like to share with you:

Homeschool Conferences & Events (Listed by state with an interactive map)

Homeschool Convention Survival Guide (Free eBook)

Homeschool 101: Homeschool Conventions

5 Ways to Prepare for a Homeschool Convention

See Demme Learning at a Homeschool Convention

At the Demme Learning booth you can stop by for a personalized demonstration of our Math-U-See and Spelling You See products. Our knowledgeable staff is happy to answer any of your questions.

See where Demme Learning will be in 2020.

See Demme Learning at a homeschool convention to receive personalized, individual attention by our passionate team.


Accelerated Individualized Mastery (AIM) Questions & Answers


Do you have a student who’s tried just about everything to get those math facts memorized and nothing seems to work? We’re here to share with you an exciting new product that might just make the difference. This product is especially designed for an older student who has not yet mastered their addition and subtraction facts.

I want to first of all encourage you, the parent who is out there dealing with this, that you are not alone. Here are the answers to some questions you might have about AIM.

9 Questions About AIM

1) What is AIM?

The new product tis a portion of our of Math-U-See curriculum. It’s called AIM (Accelerated Individualized Mastery) and its focus is on helping older students get their addition and subtraction math facts memorized.

2) Do we need to be using Math-U-See to use AIM?

Absolutely not. You do not need to be using Math-U-See as your core math curriculum to benefit from AIM. This intervention is tremendous to help students fill in the mathematical gap that exists in their fact knowledge with addition and subtraction.

3) How often do you support parents regarding mastery?

AIM is designed for a student of any age who has completed addition and subtraction coursework without achieving mastery. It seems like almost every phone call we have someone that has a student that doesn’t have their math facts memorized.

It’s tough because a lot of math programs and schools don’t put an emphasis on this. We’re finding that more and more students need to go back and achieve mastery of their addition and subtraction facts.

It’s a very common problem, and it’s actually the reason why we developed the AIM program with the help of parents of struggling students. From countless conversations with parents, we heard their needs, which helped us develop the program.

4) What are some signs that mastery needs work?

Some of the obvious signs are counting on fingers, using touch point math, relying on calculators, or hesitating when completing a math problem. Sometimes we see that in the non-telltale signs of, “I hate math. I don’t want to do math.” Parents avoid doing math with their kid and all of that usually speaks to one root cause: the child doesn’t have confidence in their own mathematical ability.

AIM is a tremendous collaboration between the staff of Math-U-See and those parents who thought their children would never memorize math facts.

5) How can lack of mastery affect confidence?

We see a lot of times that as problems get bigger, confidence decreases. If we don’t have the confidence for those smaller problems, it’s hard to have them for the bigger problems.

At the same time, when we count on our fingers or count in our head, we tend to look away from the problem, come back, and forget where we were. We miss certain steps and we have all of this stuff in our head; when that happens we make easy mistakes. Memorization of facts is so important to the confidence and flow of doing well with these bigger problems.

6) How will AIM be better than flashcards and drills?

In all honesty, we often resort to flashcards and drills because that’s what we were taught. Unfortunately, flashcards or drills don’t teach. You have to have the fact committed to memory before you can become proficient at them through this repetitive practice. The techniques that AIM uses allows a student to step along a continuum. To go from initial understanding to complete memorization is an expeditious process.

7) Will AIM result in my student becoming behind?

It’s recommended to take a 6-8 week break from other math studies while working through AIM. This is a common question, and a very big concern for a lot of families: making sure that their student is up to speed.

We recognize that math builds upon itself. We don’t use grade levels because it’s hard to learn mathematical concepts if you haven’t mastered the previous concepts. Our goal is that we take the time to fill in those gaps in understanding, which AIM can do in about a 6-8 week period.

We sometimes see that other gaps that were there earlier might tend to disappear because of the work that we’re doing at the beginning. If we keep doing what we’re doing, the gaps are only going to get bigger; they’re not going to decrease. It’s more important that we go back and fill in those gaps to cause more success and greater confidence later on. The additional understanding and confidence gained by filling these gaps can mean greater and faster progress when you return to your regular math studies.

8) What if my student has a learning glitch?

We often work with kids who learn differently; we find frequently that even students who have been diagnosed with a specific learning challenge can use the principles of AIM and learn effectively. Those learning glitches seem to disappear when we give kids the ability to step along that continuum and learn in a different way.

9) Where can we learn more about AIM?

One of the things you’re going to notice is we’re very passionate about helping families find success for their students in math. We’d love to have an individualized conversation with you; we’d love to help.

You can learn more about AIM on our website and take the assessment there.


AIM Unboxing Video

Do You Have Any Questions?


AIM is a tremendous collaboration between the staff of Math-U-See and those parents who thought their children would never memorize math facts.

Introducing New Product from Math-U-See


Math-U-See is proud to introduce a short-term “fill in the gaps” program for older students who could benefit from additional support in fundamental skills.
We have long used the Math-U-See curriculum’s strategies and manipulatives to allow students to successfully master math concepts. We’re proud to introduce a short-term “fill in the gaps” program for older students who could benefit from additional support in fundamental skills.

Introducing AIM

A new solution for struggling math students with gaps in their math fact knowledge:

Accelerated – move quickly through a skill set they have not yet mastered
Individualized – appeals to a variety of learning preferences 
Mastery – recall math facts with as little mental energy as possible

AIM was created for students aged 8 and older who:

○ Have gaps in mastery of their single-digit addition and subtraction facts
○ Show signs such as tally marks or counting on their fingers
○ Are struggling as they face increasingly advanced math concepts


AIM Unboxing Video



Clarity and Confidence: Finding the Right Spelling Curriculum


Something was missing, but I could not find the missing piece to the puzzle; until, Spelling You See.

Vision Impairment

Some parents make the decision to homeschool because their child is struggling in school. It was the opposite for me. With the support of my husband, I decided to become a homeschool teacher because I did not want our children to struggle through school like I did. Actually, through elementary, high school, and college, both my husband and I had a vision impairment called myopia that went undetected in school. Myopia is a refractive error in the eyes causing nearsightedness. We received our first pair of prescription glasses after high school, after we were married, and after we became parents. We both found out we had a vision problem long after we passed the eye chart exams at school and at the DMV. With our first pair of prescription glasses, we gained clarity and confidence. Learning became easy, and homeschool became our way of life.

Perception at School

Without his glasses, my husband is able to see for about five feet before the world becomes blurry, and his prescription is -1.00 in each eye; therefore, his was a minor adjustment, and he was an average student. My prescription is -3.25 in each eye, and I can only see clearly for a distance of about 10-12 inches; therefore without corrective lenses, I function at a level considered ‘border-line-legally-blind.’ In first grade, I was placed in special reading classes, and the special education label stuck all the way through school. As a child, trying to focus on an object was a game I played with my eyes. I assumed everyone’s perception of the world was the same. Squinting created a pin-hole-effect, a lightning flash moment of clarity, enough time to identify a single letter. By standing still and concentrating, I was able to pass an eye exam. I was never told I wasn’t allowed to squint; I was told to do my best. Although I was able to see my books and my homework on my desk at school, I was not able to read words written on the board, nor posters on the wall, nor signs in the street. Although my husband and I were not the best students, both of us were actually quite bright and creative to do as well as we did in school.

We Weren’t Good Spellers

Before our children were ready for kindergarten, I used a popular phonics curriculum to teach them how to read, and I realized I was learning with them. As an adult, I taught myself to read, by teaching my children to read. I accomplished my goal, my kids could read well at a young age, but none of us were good spellers. I searched and searched for curriculum. I found wonderful math, grammar, and writing programs, so we excelled in these areas. I became more of a student than a teacher learning along with my children. I completed all the work with them as I was truly learning it for the first time. We took turns doing math problems; they did an even numbered problem, then I did an odd numbered problem. We did most of our work together as a team; sometimes, they took turns being the teacher for the day. Remembering my days in special education classes, I realized I never did experience working through a step-by-step, well-planned-out-curriculum.

Looking for a Spelling Curriculum

During our homeschool years, I was still searching, yet not able to find a spelling program that worked for us. Something was missing, but I could not find the missing piece to the puzzle; until, Spelling You See. The Spelling You See curriculum was the missing part to our homeschooling program. I finally understood; after talking with Dr. Karen Holinga, The Reading Doctor, that reading is decoding (converting words from print to sound) while spelling is encoding (converting sounds to printed form). Reading and spelling are completely different skills that use a different part of the brain. As she explained the progression of the spelling levels, I realized that we had skipped over and missed the third and most difficult level of spelling called the skill development stage. My kids had a strong phonics background, but not a strong encoding background; therefore, irregularly-spelled words remained easy to read but difficult to spell. Nevertheless, with help from spell-check, my adult children graduated with honors at a university.

One is never too old, nor too young, to learn. I ordered the Spelling You See program, and I am using it with my grandson who is now almost two years old. It is exciting! After all these years God answered my prayers. After story time, my grandson watches me write my dictation words. This has become our favorite time together. What I love the most about the Spelling You See program is that in Level A (Listen and Write) it requires only ten minutes a day. Once I have completed the assignment, my grandson practices his prewriting skills, drawing over the words he just watched me write, spell, and read. He uses pens to color and highlight. He is beginning to trace over the letters. Babies are so smart! He already knows all the uppercase and lowercase letters, is learning the letter sounds, and is even beginning to recognize some words. Because he watches and listens, he understands the concept that letters spell words. Together, we are having so much fun.

Eye care professionals recommend children have their first comprehensive eye exam sometime around preschool age, and just before starting kindergarten. Our grandson will be having his first eye exam at the optometrist office soon. He may or may not need to wear prescription glasses like grandpa and grammie. The good news is, with good vision, and without having to rely on spell-check, we can all have more clarity and confidence in everything we do.

This blog post was written by a Spelling You See customer who wanted to share per personal story using the curriculum.

Something was missing, but I could not find the missing piece to the puzzle; until, Spelling You See.

Demme Learning Named One of the Best Places to Work in Pennsylvania


Demme Learning has been named one of the Best Places to Work in PA for 2019! This is our first time receiving this award and we’re honored to have ranked #27 in the small-sized company category this year.

Demme Learning employees at the 2019 Best Places to Work in Pennsylvania event.

Demme Learning's Best Places to Work in Pennsylvania group photo.

We’re proud to be recognized for our culture, benefits package, and talented employees. Our culture is very relaxed and family-friendly. Employees are encouraged to be themselves at work. In addition, new employees are eligible for benefits starting on their first day. Some of our benefits include telecommuting opportunities, paid family leave, paid time off to volunteer, tuition reimbursement, gym reimbursement and flexible work times. Most importantly, our workforce is made up of driven, talented, and energetic people with positive mindsets that help us continue to grow.

Ethan Demme accepts an award for Demme Learning at the 2019 Best Places to Work in Pennsylvania event.

The Best Places To Work in PA program was established nearly 20 years ago and is one of the first statewide programs of its kind in the country. The program is a public/private partnership between Team Pennsylvania Foundation, the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, the Pennsylvania State Council of the Society for Human Resource Management, and the Central Penn Business Journal.


Math-U-See & Spelling You See Webinars


We're giving you all the answers about Math-U-See and Spelling You See in our upcoming webinar series.

Let’s Build Lifelong Learners Together

There’s a lot that goes into your child’s education and we want to help by giving you the tools you need to succeed.

Since we have a lot to talk about, we’re breaking things down and giving you all the answers in our upcoming webinar series about our Math-U-See and Spelling You See products.

Sign up and watch our webinars LIVE to:

• Learn from experts and get your questions answered in real time
• Find out what it takes to build your lifelong learner
• Get insight on our curricula
• And much, much more!

How Math-U-See Will Lead Your Student to Mathematical Success

Is your student struggling with math? Join me for a brief webinar to discover 5 reasons how Math-U-See can help build mathematical confidence for your student.

WHEN: Tuesday November 5th at 11:00am Eastern

Register for the Webinar

Check back soon for more webinars! In the mean-time, subscribe to the Demme Learning newsletter:

Subscribe to the Demme Learning Newsletter

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Steve Demme’s Stewardship Math Curriculum Has a New Edition


After six months of writing and filming (and four months of editing and proofing), the New Edition of Stewardship has been released.

Stewardship, 2nd Edition

After six months of writing and filming (and four months of editing and proofing), the New Edition of Stewardship has been released.

Stewardship is a personal finance curriculum taught from a biblical perspective. With Steve Demme’s signature humility, humor, and sharp math skills, practical math instruction is combined with Biblical principles of finance and discipleship material. This edition is updated with current topics relevant to young people aged 15 and older, who are beginning to explore more independent financial opportunities and responsibilities.

Order Stewardship

Stewardship Video

Watch a short video about Stewardship below.

What’s Included in Stewardship?

There are three books that comprise the written material: the Instruction Manual, Biblical Studies, and Student Workbook. The video instruction may be viewed or downloaded via the Internet.

Instruction Manual

This book is where you will find teaching, several examples of the new materials, and the answer keys for all 36 lessons. Study this book and watch the video instruction to learn the content of each lesson.

As this book was written, it was I assumed that students would have some knowledge of algebra, and would be between fifteen and seventeen years old.

Download the Table of Contents

Biblical Studies

This book has two sections: one on Biblical Principles to govern our treasure, and the other on Scripture Studies to instruct our heart. As stated earlier, Jesus says in Luke 12:34, “Where your treasure is, there will your heart be.” Steve’s objective in pulling these studies together is to impact our heart and our treasure (money, time, gifts, talents, and energy) with the eternal Word of God.

Download the Table of Contents

Student Workbook

After you’ve watched the video portion and read the Instruction Manual (along with the two Biblical Studies portions), then you are ready to begin work in the Student Workbook. Each of the 36 lessons has five worksheets per lesson, for a total of 180 student worksheets.

Each worksheet has ten questions. Questions 1-7 are taken from the math involved in personal finance, 8-9 are from the Biblical Studies, and number 10 is a discussion question to facilitate interaction between students and their parents and grandparents.

Order Stewardship

The Stewardship curriculum provides solid, practical lessons that gave my student a strong start to real-world financial decision-making. The worksheets challenged my student to think through real-life situations that she will face coming into adulthood. The Biblical Foundation and Discipleship portion frame the study and clearly show Mr. Demme’s  heart for helping parents build lives of consequence. Our family highly recommends adding Stewardship to your homeschool plan! – S. Cooper


Homeschooling Pros & Cons


Guest blogger Kyla presents homeschooling pros & cons in this blog post.

It’s Kyla from Little Footsteps Big Learning, and today I will be discussing the pros and cons of homeschooling. Before we get to this, I thought I’d give a little background on myself. I’m a mom to three boys, age 6, 5 and 2, and I’m currently homeschooling them.

I studied elementary education, and after that, I had several years of experience teaching in a variety of situations, including working at an elementary school, working with special needs kids, and teaching preschool. Preschool is kind of my main area of focus that I spent the most time in and love the most, and now I teach homeschool. My oldest son went to kindergarten in public school, and then first grade we started him in homeschool. So we’ve had a little bit of both, me from the teaching side, and him from the student side, and me also from the parent side.

This blog post was originally published as a video.

The Pros of Homeschooling

1) Being Involved With Your Kids

The top reason for me is being involved with your kids. Obviously, with homeschooling, you’re going to have them at home more, and you’re going to be more involved in their education and what they’re learning. You have a little more control over what they’re learning and just knowledge about what’s going on in the school day. I’ve appreciated being able to discuss things at the dinner table to reinforce what they’re learning. When Dad comes home, we have dinner together. I can prompt the kids to tell him about their day, and if they just say, “Uh, I don’t remember,” I remember what they learned, and I can prompt them in that.

2) Control Over Your Schedule

You get to choose their schedule if you homeschool, customize your schedule, and make it work for you. There’s a lot of flexibility in that.

3) Not Confined

With public school, you have a start time for school and an end time for school. You might have a bus coming and picking up and dropping off your child at a certain time that you need to be at the bus stop, and your whole life runs around that schedule and being there.

With homeschool, that’s usually not the case. You may have your child signed up for certain classes or activities that happen at certain times, but usually the schedule is pretty flexible.

3) Lots of Options

When I first started looking into homeschool, I didn’t realize how many options there were. I kind of thought the options were you homeschool, or you do public school or there’s other private schools and whatnot, but it’s mostly a classroom setting or a homeschool setting. And as I started looking into homeschool, I realized there are a lot of different options.

There are some state funded homeschooling programs that you can use their curriculum and teach them at home. There are online public school options, which is kind of public school, but it’s also kind of homeschool. It’s a little mix in between. You can also just buy your own curriculum, find your own curriculum that you love, and do your own thing. Lots of different options to choose from.

4) Snow Days & Sick Days

If your child is sick or if there’s too much snow outside that a public school would call a snow day, that’s not something you have to worry about really at home. You don’t have to worry about driving on the roads to get someplace because you’re already at home where you’re going to have school, and you can still do school like normal.

On sick days, those are a little more flexible depending on how sick your kid is, but you can still squeeze school in. You’re at home; maybe taking things a little bit slower, but you don’t have to worry about your kid going to school and getting other kids sick.

Instead of having snow days or sick days, where your kid is not going to school, something that’s really nice with homeschool is being able to do things like sunny days that instead of taking the day off of school when there’s snow outside, I would much rather take the day off of school when there’s sun outside, when there’s really nice weather and say, “You know what? Today we’re going take a break. We’re not going to have school today. We’re going to get outside and do something outside because the weather is so nice.”

5) Opportunities & Flexibility

I have chosen to have my kids involved in a nursing home. We get together with a group of other homeschoolers, and we go to a nursing home. We sing songs to them, and what a great way to get out and serve and to have them involved in that. We have a lot more flexibility of our time because we homeschool, to be able to pick a time that works for us, and that ends up being part of our school day once a month.

Another thing is swimming lessons. Since we’re home during the day, our hours are more flexible, and swimming lessons can be at an earlier time instead of just needing to cram everything into those after school hours. That was something that was a really hard thing for me when my son was in all day long kindergarten. He would be gone majority of the day, and then when he got home, it was rush, rush, rush from one thing to the next. If you wanted to do any extracurricular activities, it needed to happen during those times after school, between after school and bedtime, and that can make your family time really stressful. With homeschool, you have a little more flexibility in your schedule to choose to have swimming lessons earlier in the day, or some sort of extracurricular activity where it’s not taking away much family time in order to do those things.

6) Kids Learn From Each Other

At school, obviously at a public school setting or a classroom setting, but also at home, it’s really neat to see how my 2-year old picks up on the things that my 6-year old and 5-year old are learning. We’ll do calendar time right here in this space, and I involve our 2-year old. It’s really neat to hear him chanting what different letters of the alphabet and see him mimic what his older brothers are doing. Even though he’s 2 and I’m not doing any formal schooling with him, he’s learning. By time he gets to be the age of doing a little more formal schooling, I hope that he already has ingrained in him a little bit more of the schedule of things.

The Cons of Homeschooling

1) Not Feeling Prepared

The number one con that I hear people talk about when they are considering homeschool is not knowing how to start, or if they are ready.

“How am I going to know where my child needs to be at?”
“How am I going to know if I’m teaching them the right things?”
“If there are any gaps in their learning, am I leaving anything behind? How am I going to know that?”

There are definitely resources that can help you with that, but that’s definitely a con of homeschooling versus not homeschooling. It’s your responsibility to make sure they’re learning what they’re supposed to be learning.

2) The Schedule

We talked about customizing your schedule as a pro, but there’s also a con to that because you have to choose your schedule. You have to figure out what you’re doing and what’s going to work best for your family. It’s not already built in; it’s something that you have to do.

Also with that is the flexibility. I talked about that being a huge pro, but it can also be a con because, depending on your kid’s personality, too much flexibility could lead to laziness, to not getting the things done that you’re supposed to. What’s your personality like? Is flexibility going to help your kids stay on top of things, or is it going to be more damaging for you and your kids?

3) Being With Your Kids All the Time

I talked about you getting to spend a lot of time with your kids and how great that is, but that can also be a con because there are a lot of things that needs to be done in life. And doing homeschooling, I have constant responsibility over my kids, and that is great. I love spending time with them, and I love teaching them. However, it does make it a little bit difficult to schedule doctor appointments, to have just me time, getting home projects done, those other things that need to be done can be a little more tricky when your kids are with you all the time.

4) All the Options

I talked about how many options there are with homeschool and choosing different options, and that is really great if you know what you want and customizing that to your child. That can also be overwhelming because there’s too many options, and it’s so hard to know how to choose.

5) Limited Access to Teachers & Specialists

Wen you’re doing homeschooling versus something like public schooling, you do not have the access to lots of teachers and specialists that can help you out. For example, if your child has speech delays or another disability that you might not detect but a specialist at a school could detect, not only are they there to help hone in on those things, but then you also have the resources for those. And not just for things like special needs, but also having all of the classes like art and music and gym. You have teachers who have gone to school for that specific area, and they know that so well. And if you’re doing homeschool, you don’t have access to those right at your fingertips like you normally would with something like public school.

6) A Sense of Community

Something that I really loved about sending my kid to kindergarten in public school was this built-in sense of community. My child already has kids in his class that he’s getting to know, kids that he’s friends with. There are events that happen at the school. There’s the wonderful PTA that puts on events like the science fair project or talent shows or cultural events, just lots of different activities like that that are already built in.

You already have that community, and with homeschool, if you’re wanting a community like that, it’s something that you need to seek out, which is great because you can customize and know what you’re getting into and not just, “This is what’s given to me.” But you have to go to the work to go out and find it, and that can be a little bit of a challenge. There are lots of online groups that you can find in areas, but it is definitely something that you have to dig out and you have to find.

About the Author

Kyla Shurtz is a mom of 3 boys (ages 6, 5 and 2) with a baby girl on the way! She studied Elementary Education in college, taught 8 years in a variety of school settings, including public school, working with special needs children and teaching preschool. Kyla now homeschools her own children and is enjoying the adventure! She has been married to her wonderful husband for 9 years, she enjoys photography and loves the outdoors-especially hiking, camping and family bike rides. Kyla has a love of learning and a love of teaching. She is passionate about bringing encouragement and sparking ideas for other moms and teachers.

Kyla Shurtz is a mom of 3 boys (ages 6, 5 and 2) with a baby girl on the way! She studied Elementary Education in college, taught 8 years in a variety of school settings, including public school, working with special needs children and teaching preschool. Kyla now homeschools her own children and is enjoying the adventure! She has been married to her wonderful husband for 9 years, she enjoys photography and loves the outdoors-especially hiking, camping and family bike rides. Kyla has a love of learning and a love of teaching. She is passionate about bringing encouragement and sparking ideas for other moms and teachers.

Guest blogger Kyla presents homeschooling pros & cons in this blog post.

Current Homeschool Demographics [Infographic]


Many families who are considering homeschooling first want to look into homeschool demographics before making that decision.

Many families who are considering homeschooling first want to look into the demographic data of homeschoolers. It is important for homeschoolers to have support and confidence in their
journey so that they can have a successful and enjoyable experience, and the good news is that the number of families engaging in home education has grown significantly in North America in the last twenty years and continues to increase.

Homeschool Demographics

‣ Homeschooling rates are growing at a rate of 2-8% each year.

‣ There are about 2.3 million home educated students in the United States.

3.4 million adults in the United States have been homeschooled at some point in their education.

‣ The average homeschooler educates at home for 6 to 8 years.

‣ In 2011, 91% of homeschooling
parents were concerned about the environment of other schools.

‣ Homeschooled students score 15-30% higher on average than public school students on standardized academic achievement tests.

‣ Only 83% of families continue homeschooling past their first year. However, 89% of those families continue home education for a third year and beyond.

‣ Whether or not homeschooling parents are certified teachers does not impact their children’s academic achievement.

Many families who are considering homeschooling first want to look into the demographic data of homeschoolers.

Why People Choose to Homeschool

Some of the most common reasons for homeschooling include:

‣ Being able to provide an individualized learning experience for each child.

‣ Achieving higher academic accomplishments than traditional schools.

‣ Using alternative approaches to learning.

‣ Enhancing family relationships between parents and siblings.

‣ Fostering meaningful and healthy social interactions with peers.

‣ Providing a safer environment for their children.

‣ Teaching a particular set of values to their children.

Some of the most common reasons for homeschooling include...

Resources Cited

National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI)

National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)

Demme Learning